book

Book: Information security for journalists - V1.1

With journalist Silkie Carlo I have co-authored a 'handbook' on practical information security for journalists commissioned by the UK Centre for Investigative Journalism. The CIJ handbook 'Information Security for Journalists' was launched at the CIJ Summer School 2014 in London. The book will be forever freely available in a range of electronic formats - see download links below. In the four months after the initial publication in we have rewritten certain parts based on feedback from the initial readers and updated other parts to stay current with the latest software changes. Many thanks to all who gave us valuable feedback.

Altough this book was originally written for investigative journalists most of the described concepts and technical solutions are just as usable by lawyers or advisors protecting communications with their clients, doctors protecting medical privacy and of course politicians, activists or anyone else who engages powerful state and corporate organisations. Really, we're all journalists now. Inside the book is a mailadres for getting in touch, please let us know how your are using it and what we can do better.

If you have reasons to suspect your online movements are already under some form of surveilance you should not download this book using a computer or netwpork associated with your identity (such as your home or work systems).

Several participants of journalist training programs have written articles: Information security for journalists: staying secure online by Alastair Reid (from journalism.co.uk) - A day with the surveillance expert by Jason Murdock, Offtherecord.in - Valentina Novak wrote this interview after a lecture & workshop in Slovenia last November.

On Tuesday July 8th 2014 I was once more a guest on Max Keiser's programme 'The Keiser Report' to discuss the book. Video here on my blog, here on RT site and here on Youtube.

From the 'backflap' of the book:

Bruce Schneier on security trade-offs

Beyond_fear Bruce Schneier just posted a really good explanation about "the difference between feeling and reality in security". It is one of those articles I wish I'd written. Not because there is a great new nugget of insight in it but because it explains some very basic problems in thinking about security so very well.

The gist of the article is that as people living in modern environments we can have a hard time accurately estimating realistic trade offs between risks and reward. When the world was closely resembling the world we had developed in as a species we were better at it. Our brains were supported by millions of years of evolution in correctly estimating the risk versus rewards of certain actions. There's food here and a lion, should I stay or run? The specimens who made bad trade-off calls died of hunger or lions. The ones making good calls had many babies.

Bruce Schneier on security trade-offs

Beyond_fear Bruce Schneier just posted a really good explanation about "the difference between feeling and reality in security". It is one of those articles I wish I'd written. Not because there is a great new nugget of insight in it but because it explains some very basic problems in thinking about security so very well.

The gist of the article is that as people living in modern environments we can have a hard time accurately estimating realistic trade offs between risks and reward. When the world was closely resembling the world we had developed in as a species we were better at it. Our brains were supported by millions of years of evolution in correctly estimating the risk versus rewards of certain actions. There's food here and a lion, should I stay or run? The specimens who made bad trade-off calls died of hunger or lions. The ones making good calls had many babies.